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Amino acids – What role do they play in muscle building, weight loss and fitness?

Amino Acids. What role do they play in muscle building, weight loss and fitness? Learn what Aminos are an how the effect your body.

Why do the majority of people who go to the gym to build muscle know so little of amino acids and protein, and their importance in achieving our goal of muscle building? Amino acids; everyone has heard of them, protein powders list them. So what is the importance of them? Do we really need them?

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein and also muscle tissue. And they also play a major part in physiological processes relating to our energy, recovery, mood, brain function, muscle and strength gains, and also in our quest for fat loss.

There are 23 amino acids and 9 of these are classed as essential or indispensable amino acids (IAA) that must be obtained from our nutritional intake. The others are termed dispensable amino acids (DAA) or non-essential due to the body being able to synthesise them from other amino acids.

When we eat a meal we don’t pay much attention to the content and balance of amino acids but the content of the meal determines the body and health building value of the protein food or supplement. In addition the importance of the amino acids content of our meal is important to support maximum growth we also have to take another factor into account which is to what extent these amino acids are actually delivered to the tissues when they are needed which takes us to the issues of digestion, absorption and also the bioavailability.

What is Bioavailability?
Eating our protein foods such as lean meats and non-fat dairy products, or having our protein drinks are the most common ways that we get our amino acids, we also can obtain amino acids from vegetables, and legumes also have levels of most amino acids. We can also use protein drinks and amino acid supplements as a convenient means to supplement our dietary needs.

The reason we use these supplements is the bioavailability of the amino acids. Bioavailability is a measure of the efficiency of delivery and how much of what is ingested is used for its intended use by the body. There are factors which determine the amino acid bioavailability. One is how much fat is contained in the protein source and the length of time it takes for the amino acids to be available for use by the body.
Cooking also can affect the amino acids; some are more or less sensitive to heat and cooking may cause decomposition of some amino acids. The physical nature of the particular food is also a factor, whether it is solid, liquid, powder, or even tablet, and to what extent it is chemically pre-digested as some amino acid supplements are, fillers and binders also can have an affect on the digestion of the amino acid. The condition of our digestive system can also have an affect on amino acid digestion, genetics, age, health, specific diseases and illnesses all have an affect on our digestion.

Amino acids and Bodybuilding
Exercise, hormones and nutrients will all cause muscle growth. As will supplementation of free form amino acids high in the branch chain amino acids (BCAA’s) Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine. The best time for us to get our amino acids is immediately after our training when the muscle is especially receptive to nutrients and also blood flow to the exercised muscles which still remains high. The solution to optimising our recovery and growth after training is a s meal composed of protein with both simple and some complex carbohydrates. This is the time when ideally we require a fast digesting protein such as whey protein.

Amino Acid Supplementation
The popularity of amino acid supplements has increased dramatically. Packaged workout and recovery drinks that contain hydrolysed (pre-digested) proteins and often some free-form amino acids can be found in most gyms. Also tubs of powdered or capsulated amino acids are being used by an increasing number of weight trainers. The good thing about these supplements is that they don’t require digestion like food does. The term free-form means that they are free of chemical bonds to other molecules and as such move quickly through the stomach, into the small intestines where they are very rapidly absorbed into the blood stream. When absorbed, amino acids are processed by the liver. The liver can only process so many at one time, so by taking a dose of 3-4g of amino acids these will be rapidly absorbed and would exceed the liver’s capacity which would result in the amino acids being directed to the tissues that would require them such as muscle that is recovering from your training.

Amino Acids and Energy
A lot of misconceptions exist about the muscle contraction and the use of energy substrates during heavy high intensity weight training. When performing your training using repetitive power workouts a substantial portion of your energy comes from non-carbohydrate sources. When your muscles contract they use stores of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, a substance vital to the energy processes of all our living cells) for the first few seconds. The compound used to immediately replenish these stores is creatine phosphate (CP). This is how the supplement creatine, became so popular to bodybuilders and strength trained athletes. Creatine is made from three amino acids: arginine, methionine and glycine.

To keep our CP and ATP levels high, these amino acids must be kept elevated in our blood stream. The amino acids in creatine supplements can be supplied by foods in our diet but the process of elevating these amino acids takes a great deal of time in digestion, and also would be accompanied by fats and carbohydrates which may or may not be desired. So the use of free form amino acids, either alone or in combination with creatine supplements can provide direct source of energy for power and strength.

Amino Acids & Fat Loss
In fat loss two major processes must occur (1) the mobilisation and circulation of stored fats in the body must be increased; and (2) Fats must be transported and converted to energy at the mitochondria (the powerhouse site of cells). Several nutrients can assist in the conversion of fat to energy including the amino acid methionine, which in sufficient amounts can help improve the transport and metabolism of fat. When attempting to keep our total calories down during dieting, amino acid supplements including BCAA’s and glutamine can also help to keep our food volume down but still provide support directly to the muscles, liver and our immune systems which are critical to optimising our body composition.

Amino Acids & Muscle Catabolism
Our body has the ability to breakdown our muscle tissue for use as an energy source during heavy exercise. This is part of a bodily process called gluconeogenesis which means producing or generating glucose from non-carbohydrate sources. The part of this reaction that is important to us as bodybuilders is known as the glucose – alanine cycle, in which the BCAA’s are stripped from the muscle tissue and parts of them being converted to the amino acid alanine, which is then transported to the liver and converted into glucose. If we consume supplemental BCAA’s the body does not have to breakdown our muscle tissue to gain extra energy. Studies have concluded that the use of BCAA’s (up to 4g) during and after training can result in a significant reduction of muscle breakdown during training. Catabolism of muscle can cause shrinkage of our muscles and muscle soreness and may also lead us to injury.

Amino Acids and the Anabolic effect
Resistance training generally stimulates both protein synthesis and protein degradation in exercised muscle fibres. Muscle hypertrophy (growth) occurs when an increase in protein synthesis results in the body’s normal state of protein synthesis and degradation. The normal hormonal environment (e.g, insulin and growth hormone levels) in the period following resistance training stimulates the muscle fibres anabolic processes while blunting muscle protein degradation. Dietary modifications that increase amino acid transport into muscles raise energy availability or increase anabolic hormones should augment the training effects by increasing the rate of muscle anabolism and/or decreasing muscle catabolism. Either effect should create a positive body protein balance for improved muscular growth and strength.

References:
Amino acids. Barry Finnin, PHD. and Samual Peters .
Exercise physiology. 5th Edition, William D, McArdle. Frank I Katch, Victor L Katch.

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5 Plant Based Foods That Have More Protein than Meat

Protein gets a lot of attention, especially in a plant-based diet where the issue of complete and incomplete protein comes into play, along with protein per amount of weight, which is something else to consider. For instance, we don’t need to combine foods as we once thought to form a complete protein (such as beans and rice). That protein myth died years ago, thankfully when we found out our bodies are capable of using all sources of amino acids to form complete proteins.
Not Just Grams … What to Consider When Measuring Protein
It’s also important to consider that amounts in grams aren’t the only thing that matters when measuring protein in a food. You should also consider what percentage of total calories protein makes up in a food. For instance, beef and animal foods are high in calories and though they contain a good size amount of protein, per amount of calories, beef and animal proteins (even fish) are higher in cholesterol-forming saturated animal fats, where most of their calories come from. Plant-based foods on the other hand, have fewer calories, a variety of sources of amino acids that form complete proteins in the body and per weight, their percentage of protein in the amount of total calories is relatively high.
Some plant-based foods are higher in protein percentage than others, however, so making sure to include a variety of plant-based foods in your diet is important for achieving the amount of protein your body needs. Beef contains 7 grams of protein per ounce for about 75 calories, so let’s compare some better plant-based options that don’t come with the health risks beef and animal proteins do.
Here are five foods with more protein per gram than beef that also come with a higher percentage of protein per amount of calories:
spirulinaPer gram, Spirulina is 65% protein, the highest amount of protein percentage of all foods. In just 1 teaspoon, you’ll get 4 grams of protein, which is unheard of for all other foods. Spirulina is also a great source of iron, providing 80 % of your daily needs in just 1 teaspoon and at only 30 calories. You can add this blue green algae to your smoothies to mask the taste and know you’re getting in a nice dose of B vitamins, protein, iron and vital trace minerals. Since it’s also alkalizing, spirulina also reduces inflammation, unlike animal foods that contribute to it.
spinach
Yes, the humble Spinach contains 51 % protein (about 5 grams per cup at only 30 calories). It’s also a good source of iron and Vitamin C. This much-loved green is also a great source of folate, an important vitamin for women that contributes to strength, brain function and reproductive health. Adding a couple cups of spinach to your smoothie, salad, wrap, soup, or any other way, is an easy way to sneak in 10 grams of protein without the need for a supplement powder whatsoever.
hempseedsHemp is one of the best, easy-to-use foods that’s rich in all essential fatty acids and all 20 amino acids. Per ounce (about 2 tablespoons)  has 10 grams of protein, is high in fibre and most of its calories come from beneficial proteins and Omega fatty acids. Unlike animal-based proteins and sources of fat, hemp is very alkalizing to the body and also boosts the mood and energy thanks to high amounts of magnesium. It can also increase metabolism due to it containing 45 % of your daily iron requirements in just one ounce. You can also use hemp protein, another fantastic way to get this whole food into your diet. We enjoy it in smoothies, raw treats, but you can even stir it into oatmeal and bake with it in place of flour if you like. Although, it is better to consume hemp raw (not cooked), as heat destroys the fatty acids.
broccoli
Per calorie, broccoli has more protein than beef, which about 4.5 grams per 30 calories. Broccoli is also packed with amino acids, fibre, Vitamin B6 to improve your mood and is one of the best vegetables linked to fighting cancer.
almondsAlmonds and almond butter both provide 7 grams of protein in one ounce, along with heart-healthy fats and Vitamin E. They’re also a good source of calcium and provide high doses of beneficial magnesium.
Peanut butter is another high source of protein, with 8 grams per two tablespoons of peanut butter. While higher in calories than beef per ounce, these nut butters are rich in amino acids per ounce and also recommended as a good source of plant-based protein.
 

Plant-Based, High Protein Smoothie

Combine all these foods into a smoothie for a crazy, high-protein meal that your body will love and one that will shock you in how great it tastes! You’ll never know it contains good-for-you veggies!
greenproteinsmoothie
Servings : 1 Large or 2 Smaller
Ingredients:
1 Cup baby Spinach
4 Frozen Broccoli Florets (gives it a surprisingly great thick texture and the other ingredients hide the taste)
1/2 Cup Frozen Organic Mixed Berries or Blueberries
1 Tablespoon Cacao Powder (also a great source of protein and more iron than beef)
2-3 Tablespoons Hemptons Shelled Hemp Seeds
1 Tablespoon raw Almond Butter or Peanut Butter
1 Cup Non-Dairy Milk like Almond, Soy, Hemp or Rice Milk
Sweetener of choice – to taste (Stevia, 1/2 A Banana, A Date, A Fig, Raw Honey Or Maple Syrup)
 
Directions:
Add all the ingredients to your blender, blend together, decant and enjoy!

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Nature's Forgotten Nutraceutical

by Darrell L. Tanelian, M.D., Ph.D. – www.hemptons.co.za

That the Hemp plant (Cannabis sativa) is used as a food source initially surprises and confuses most people. The public misinformation system has largely restricted knowledge of “Hemp” as it being Marijuana … which is actually derived from the Cannabis Indica plant (same family .. different plant – like broccoli and cauliflower, same family, different plant), with its leaf content of the psychoactive substance delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).
Oil, Shelled Seed, Flour, Hemp Cake, paint and more are made from the seed, while rope and cloth is made from the Fibre of the Cannabis Sativa plant and paper from the plant stalk.
Both the oldest Chinese agricultural treatise, the Xia Xiao Zheng, written in the 16th century BC and other Chinese records discuss Hemp as one of the major grain crops grown in ancient China.
Besides its propagation in China, the cultivation and use of Hemp has, since the beginnings of recorded history, also been documented by many other great civilizations, including: India, Sumeria, Babylonia, Persia, Egypt and other nations of the Near East and the Aztec and Mayan civilizations of South America; as well as by native cultures in North America and Europe. Indeed, it might be said that over these thousands of years, Hemp has always followed humankind throughout the world, or vice versa. Nutritionally, the key point about Hemp is that its edible portion – the meat of the shelled seed – resembles the seeds of other cultivated grains including wheat and rye and does not contain THC. Moreover, the strains of Hemp plant used for food have been naturally selected so as to produce little or no THC, generally. These nutritional varieties of Hemp plant grow in temperate climates to heights of 14 feet and as with many agricultural grains, their seeds can be harvested in a conventional manner with a combine. Since the most modern handling and shelling of the seed minimize its contact with leaf resins, the shelled seed itself and the oil, nut butter and other foods prepared from the seed have been made with THC concentrations as low as 1 ucg/g (ppm) to non-detectible. These modern Hemp products, when consumed in normally recommended amounts, should all but eliminate positive urine tests for THC.
Studies conducted on older versions of Hemp seed oil found some to contain THC concentrations that resulted in positive urine tests

Nutrients in Hemp Seed

The most basic Hemp seed product is the shelled seed, sometimes referred to as the “Hemp Nut.” The other major Hemp food products are Hemp seed nut butter – which resembles peanut- and other nut butters – cold-pressed Hemp seed oil and Hemp seed flour. These basic products can be consumed alone or used along with or instead of other grains, seeds, nuts and oils in any appropriate recipe. In terms of its nutrient content, shelled Hemp seed is 34.6% protein, 46.5% fat and 11.6% carbohydrate.
The most important feature of Hemp seed is that it provides both of the essential fatty acids (EFAs) needed in the human diet – GLA, Linoleic and Alpha-Linolenic acid -as well as a complete and balanced complement of all essential amino acids.

Fats in Hemp

As compared with most nuts and seeds, the 46.5% fat content of shelled Hemp seed is relatively low and Hemp food products have a low cholesterol content and high content of the natural phytosterols that reduce cholesterol levels. Hemp Seed Oil has on average the highest mono- and poly-unsaturated fat content of all oils, taken collectively, of between 80% and 89%.
The polyunsaturated Linoleic acid, an Omega-6 fatty acid, is present in Hemp seed oil in a content of 55.6g/100g and Alpha-Linolenic acid, a polyunsaturated Omega-3 fatty acid, is present at 17.2 g/100 g. The ratio of the two EFAs is 3.38, closely approximating the 4.0 average ratio recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), Sweden and Japan for the human diet.
Conveniently, Hemp Seed Oil is also one of the only food oils to contain the direct metabolites of Linoleic and Alpha-Linolenic acid – Gamma-Linolenic acid (GLA) and Stearidonic acid (SDA), respectively. Because of this, it can circumvent the impaired EFA metabolism and physical compromise that can result from genetic factors, intake of other fats, aging and lifestyle patterns.
By contrast with unsaturated fat, only 6.6% of the total calories in shelled Hemp seed come from saturated fat – a percentage that contrasts sharply with the 13 to 14% of saturated fat calories in the modern western diet.
This gives Hemp seed oil a polyunsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio of 9.7, in comparison to the current ratio of 0.44 in the western diet, 6 and indicates that consuming even a small portion of Hemp seed oil daily can contribute strongly to bringing this dietary imbalance back toward the World Heath Organisation recommended goal of 1.0.

Hemp Protein

Besides providing the human EFAs and having a favorable unsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio, Hemp seed is an excellent dietary source of easily digestible, gluten-free protein. Its overall protein content of 34.6 g/100 g is comparable to that of soy beans and better than that found in nuts, other seeds, dairy products, meat, fish, or poultry. Hemp protein provides a well-balanced array of the 10 essential amino acids for humans. An important aspect of Hemp seed protein is a high content of arginine (123 mg/g protein) and histidine (27 mg/g protein), both of which are important for growth during childhood and of the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine (23 mg/g protein) and cysteine (16 mg/g protein), which are needed for proper enzyme formation. Hemp protein also contains relatively high levels of the branched-chain amino acids that are important for the metabolism of exercising muscle.

Other Hemp Nutrients

The carbohydrate content of shelled Hemp seed is 11.5% and its sugar content is 2%. Of the shelled Hemp seed carbohydrate, 6% is in the form of fiber. The fiber content of Hemp seed flour is 40%, which is the highest of all commercial flour grains. In addition to containing the basic human nutrient groups, Hemp foods have a high content of antioxidants (92.1 mg/100g) in the form of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol. Additionally, Hemp seed contains a wide variety of other vitamins and minerals.

Hemp in Health and Disease Prevention

The high content of Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids and the relatively high phytosterol content of Hemp foods and oils, make them beneficial to cardiovascular health. Numerous human and animal studies have shown that substitution of polyunsaturated for saturated fats can reduce the risk of sudden cardiac arrest and fatal cardiac arrhythmia, as well as reducing blood cholesterol levels and decreasing the cellular proliferation associated with atherosclerosis.
A high polyunsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio, especially when it includes Linoleic acid, has also been positively associated with reduced arterial thrombosis.
Additionally, phytosterols, of which Hemp seed contains 438 mg/100g, have been shown to reduce total serum cholesterol by an average of 10% and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by an average of 13%.
Poly-unsaturated fatty acids and especially GLA, have also been found beneficial in treating various human cancers, 13-17 and studies have shown that phytosterols may offer protection against colon, breast and prostate cancers.
Besides the importance of a proper dietary ratio of Linoleic to Alpha-Linolenic acid in maintaining the polyunsaturated fatty acid composition of neuronal and glial membranes, membrane loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids has been found in such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and it has been suggested that a diet with a proper balance of Omega-6 to Omega-3 fatty acids may help delay or reduce the neurologic effects of these diseases. A fatty acid preparation with a ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 fatty acids of 4, which is practically identical to that in Hemp oil, has been shown to improve the quality of life of Alzheimer’s disease patients.
Additionally, GLA has been found effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis and active synovitis and the GLA and vitamin D content of Hemp foods may make them beneficial in preventing and treating osteoporosis.
Moreover, supplementation with products containing EFAs has been found capable of reversing scaly skin disorder, inflammation, excessive epidermal water loss, itch and poor wound healing caused by EFA deficiency and GLA has been shown to be beneficial for atopic eczema and psoriasis.

Hemp in Cosmetics and Processed Food Products

The critical importance of EFAs and especially GLA, for healthy skin makes Hemp seed oil a highly effective skin care and cosmetic product. Its lipid constituents allow it to permeate through intact skin and to thereby nourish skin cells directly while also carrying therapeutic substances with it into the skin. These properties have led to a multitude of soaps, shampoos, skin lotions, lip balms, conditioners and other skin-care products containing Hemp seed oil.
Among food products made from Hemp seed, oil and flour are beer, pasta, cheese, cookies, waffles, granola, candy, ice cream and others, with new products now being regularly developed.
In short, Hemp can constitute an important element in nutrition, health and cosmetics, with the prospect of playing a major role in preventing disease and reducing health care expenditures.
 

References

1.      Yu Y. Agricultural history over seven thousand years in China, In: Feeding a Billion: Frontiers of Chinese Agriculture, ed. S Witter, 1987.
2.      Li H. “The Origin and Use of Cannabis in Eastern Asia: Their Linguistic Cultural Implications,” in Cannabis and Culture, ed. V Rubin, The Hague: Mouton, 1975.
3.      Leson G, Pless P, Grotenherman F, Kalant H, ElSohly MA. Food products from Hemp seeds: Could their consumption interfere with workplace drug testing J Anal Toxicol, Accepted, 2000
4.      Bosy TZ, Cole KA. Consumption and quantitation of D9 tetrahydrocannabinol in commercially available Hemp seed oil products. Anal Toxicol, 7:562-6, 2000.
5.      Kris-Etherton PM, Taylor DS, Yu-Poth S et. al. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the food chain in the United States. Am J Clin Nutr, 71:179S-88S 2000.
6.      Eaton SB, Eaton III SB, Konner MJ. Paleolithic nutrition revisited: A twelve-year retrospective on its nature and implications. Eur J Clin Nutr 51:207-216, 1997.
7.      Brousseau ME, Schaefer EJ. Diet and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Trials. Curr Atheroscler Rep 2:487-493, 2000.
8.      Siscovic DS, Raghunathan TE, King I et. al. Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest. Amer J Clin Nutr, 71:208S-212S, 2000.
9.      Kang JX, Leaf A. Prevention of fatal cardiac arrhymias by polyunsaturated fatty acids. Amer J Clin Nutr, 71:202S-207S, 2000
10.  Fan YY, Ramos KS, Chapkin RS. Modulation of atherosclerosis by dietary gamma-linolenic acid. Adv Exp Med Biol 469:485-91, 1999.
11.  Hornstra G, Kester AD. Effect of the dietary fat type on arterial thrombosis tendency: systemic studies with a rat model. Atherosclerosis 131:25-33, 1997
12.  Moghadasian MH, Frohlich JJ. Effects of dietary phytosterols on cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis: Clinical and experimental evidence. Amer J Med 107:588-94, 1999.
13.  Vartek S, Robbins ME, Spector AA. Polyunsaturated fatty acids increase the sensitivity of 36B10 rat astrocytoma cells to radiation-induced cell kill. Br J Cancer 77:1612-20, 1998.
14.  Kenny FS, Pinder SE, Ellis IO, et. al. Gamma-linolenic acid with tamoxifen as primary therapy in breast cancer. Int J Cancer 85:643-8, 2000
15.  Robbins M, Ali K, McCaw R, et. al. Gamma-linolenic acid-mediated cytotoxicity in human prostate cancer cells. Adv Exp Med Biol 469:499-504, 1999.
16.  Rizzo MT, Regazzi E, Garau D, et. al. Induction of apoptosis by arachodonic acid in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Cancer Res 59:5047-53, 1999.
17.  Southgate J, Pitt E, Trejdosiewicz LK. The effects of dietary fatty acids on the proliferation of normal human urothelial cells in vitro. Br J Cancer 74:728- 34, 1996.
18.  Awad AB, Fink CS. Phytosterols as anticancer dietary components: Evidence and mechanism of action. J Nutr 130:2127-30, 2000.
19.  Fenstrom JD. Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on neuronal function. Lipids 34:161-9, 1999.
20.  20.Youdim KA, Martin A, Joseph JA. Essential fatty acids and the brain: possible health implications. Int J Dev Neurosci 18:383-99, 2000.
21.  Yehuda S, Rabinovitz S, Carrasso RL, Mostofsky DI. Essential fatty acids preparation (SR-3) improves Alzheimer’s patients quality of life. Int J Neurosci 87:141-9, 1996.
22.  Leventhal LJ, Boyce EG, Zurier, RB. Treatment of arthritis with gamma-linolenic acid. Ann Intern Med 119:876-873, 1993.
23.  DeLuca P, Rothman D, Zurier RB. Marine and botanical lipids as immunomodulatory and therapeutic agtents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheum Dis Clin N Am 21:759-77
24.  Zurier RB, Rossetti RG, Jacobson EW, et. al. Gamma- linolenic acid treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum 39:1808-17, 1996.
25.  Kruger MC, Coetzer H, Winter R, et. al. Calcium, gamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaneoic acid supplementation in senile osteoporosis. Aging 10:385-94, 1998.
26.  Wright S. Essential fatty acids and the skin. Br J Derm 125:503-515, 1991.
27.  Horrobin DF. Essential fatty acid metabolism and its modification in atopic eczema. J Am Clin Nutr 71:367S-72S, 2000.

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Hemp Protein & Oatmeal

hemp-protein-powderIf you’re looking for a high-quality protein that’s not derived from animal sources, hemp protein powder might be for you. Mix the powder into smoothies or yogurt, but don’t stop there. Hemp protein powder may also boost the protein content of oatmeal, whether you cook it in the morning or make an overnight, soaked version. The powder contains multiple other nutrients to help you start your day right.

Not Complete

Some claim that hemp has all the essential amino acids, making it a complete protein on par with whey or soy. This is not the case, as a study in the “Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry” reported in 2010. Hemp protein lacks an adequate, digestible amount of the amino acid lysine. To ensure you get enough lysine, augment your meal of hemp protein and oats in the morning with a lunch that includes beans or lentils.

Adding Hemp to Breakfast

Hemp boosts your overall morning nutrition by providing you with essential fatty acids, iron, fiber, magnesium, potassium and calcium. Hemp-laced oatmeal also makes a quality post-workout meal to provide a combination of protein for muscle repair and carbohydrates for glycogen, or energy, restoration. One scoop of hemp protein adds about 10 grams of protein to the oats.

Mixing It In

Stir the protein powder in after you’ve cooked the oats. A tablespoon or two adds a nutty flavour and a greenish hue. Finish the oats with berries, milk and walnuts, or whatever other toppings you like. Alternatively, try the option of no-cook oatmeal by combining oats, almond milk, chia seeds, hemp protein, a little mashed banana and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Refrigerate overnight and enjoy the soft, puddinglike oats the next morning.

Quality Hemp

When shopping for hemp protein to add to your oats, go for organic varieties. Hemp readily absorbs pesticides, which may contaminate non-organic varieties. Freshness is also essential when purchasing hemp protein. If you don’t have ready access to hemp protein powder, you could add shelled hemp seeds to your oatmeal to gain the nutritional benefits of this seed.
Although hemp is related to marijuana botanically – just like broccoli and cauliflower are related, but not the same plant – hemp lacks the THC content that makes marijuana a psychoactive drug. You can’t get high from adding hemp protein to your oatmeal.

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So, what is Hemp? And why should I include it in my diet?

Many people may react cautiously to the notion of hemp as food, based on its connection to the harmful illegal drug, marijuana. Upon further exploration, however, one will discover that although hemp is family of marijuana, it is in fact a different plant – like broccoli and cauliflower are of the same family, but different plants. So, not only is the hemp seed completely THC free, it is also nutritionally superior to most other sources of protein and essential fatty acids.
 
So What Make The Hemp Seed A Super Food?
Hemp seeds contain complete protein. They are a highly digestible balance of all 20 known amino acids (both essential and non-essential) and in higher quantities than most other plant sources of protein. Hemp seeds are 33-35% protein. A mere 2 tablespoons of hemp seeds contain approximately 11g of protein!
Hemp seeds contain the globular plant proteins Edestin (65-67%) and Albumin (33-35%). Globular proteins are responsible for enzymatic functions in the blood plasma and for antibody formation, making them critical for strong immune function. Edestin is considered the most easily digestible protein and is very similar to protein in the human body. Albumin is another highly digestible and quality source of plant protein. Hemp contains the highest known levels of Edestin in the plant kingdom, making it a superior source of protein. Hemp seed is also free of trypsin inhibitors and oligosaccharides, two factors that affect the absorption and digestibility of other plant sources of protein i.e. soy.
Hemp seeds have a near perfect ratio of Omega-3 (Alpha-Linolenic) to Omega-6 (Linoleic) essential fatty acids (EFAs). The ideal ratio is considered to be 4:1 (Omega-6: Omega-3) ; hemp  seeds have a ratio of 3.38:1.
These fatty acids are required by our body via our food; we cannot synthesize them ourselves, thus the term, “essential.” Most westerners consume far more Omega-6 and not nearly enough Omega-3; this imbalanced ratio seems to go hand in hand with the common degenerative diseases of today. EFAs have a critical role in growth and development, inflammation response, mood regulation, immune strength, cardiovascular and neurological health, cellular respiration and more. Hemp also contains the fatty acids Gamma-Linolenic Acid (Omega-9), Stearidonic Acid and Oleic Acid.
The fat in hemp seed oil is 75-80% polyunsaturated fat (also known as EFAs) and less than 10% saturated fat. Hemp seeds contain approximately 44% fat. This overall fat percentage is lower than most nuts and carries with it the extremely desirable abundance of EFAs.
Hemp seeds are a good source of iron and also contains significant levels of the antioxidant vitamin E.
Hemp seeds and Hemp Seed Oil contain chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is nearly identical in molecular structure to our blood and is thus extremely beneficial to building the blood, nourishing and detoxifying the body. While the quantity is not nearly as high as the chlorophyll content of other blatantly green foods, like wheatgrass or leafy greens, the more we can increase our intake of chlorophyll the better. Chlorophyll’s presence in the hemp seed is another testament to its amazingly balanced nature.
You are probably now wondering; “Does it taste good?” My conventionally trained culinary taste buds can honestly give you a resounding, “YES!”
Hemp seed is unique in its culinary compatibility and flavour. It has a deliciously nutty and rich, yet delicate nature. Unlike what most of us know as “nuts,” hemp is a tiny, cream-colored flat disk comparable to the size of a sesame seed. Its texture is soft and creamy, not hard and crunchy. In my opinion, the taste is akin to that of a peanut or sunflower seed, yet somewhat richer and more complex. I can taste the hint of chlorophyll that dots some of the seeds; it reminds me ever so slightly of the taste I perceive when chewing a mouthful of chlorella tablets. Hemp, however, melts in your mouth. This property lends itself extremely well to blending the seeds to create smooth and creamy sauces, shakes and soups.
Besides the hemp seed, other forms of hemp food are now more widely available. Powders, often marketed as protein powder, are quite popular, as are hemp seed oil, nut butter and milk forms. Hemp is even ground into flour and used in baked goods. The red flag gets thrown here, however and we need to apply our knowledge of the fragility of essential fatty acids and proteins before we dive head first into the hemp food market.
Essential fatty acids are very susceptible to the effects of light, heat and oxygen (as most plant foods are). This means that any hemp products (or any EFA rich food) should be stored in the refrigerator, in sealed. Light-impermeable containers and not heated in any way. Some products recommend refrigeration only after opening. And that is most likely fine; however shelf life is generally increased when these products are kept cooler. EFAs and proteins change drastically when they are heated. And can transform the fats and proteins from being extremely healthful. To extremely harmful. Any temperature over the enzyme threshold temperature of 115F will initiate these harmful changes. Here is the lowdown on the most popular forms of hemp available and how to use them:
 
Hemp Seed
This is the best form currently available to us and is the hemp seed in its most whole state. Hemp seed are widely available in health food stores, raw food product stores and on the Internet. Sprinkle them on your salads, eat a handful alone, or blend them into a creamy sauce, smoothie, or soup. Keep in mind that blending causes rapid nutrient destruction and oxidation, so you won’t get as much from them by blending them as you would eating them whole.
You can also make your own hemp milk by blending the seeds with three times as much water as nuts and then straining it (optional). Most people prefer to slightly sweeten their hemp milk by adding a few drops of stevia or honey. Without any sweetener, this milk makes a delicious base for a creamy dressing or soup. Because I’m a big believer in consuming the most whole form of a food in order to benefit from the synergistic nutritional effect it has to offer and to minimize nutritional losses and modifications caused by processing, this form is my favourite and comes most highly recommended.
 
Hemp Seed Butter
This is the finely ground form of the hemp seed, similar in consistency to almond or peanut butter. lt has a green tinge to it due to its chlorophyll content. While nut butters are delicious, with a consistency that makes them quite versatile and enjoyable, there is always a question that weighs on my mind: “How hot did the commercial grinder get?” Anyone who has attempted to make nut or seed butter in their own home, whether using a homogenizing juicer, food processor, or other equipment, knows what I mean when I say that homemade nut and seed butters are never as oily and smooth as commercially made ones, unless you process the butter for lengthy periods of time until it gets quite hot.
While I have no doubt that makers of “raw” nut and seed butters do not intentionally heat their product, the heavy and quick work of commercial grinders naturally generates a considerable amount of heat. That heat releases a lot of the oils causing a commercially ground nut or seed butter to seem much more creamy and oily than one made at home. What’s wrong with this deliciously creamy spread? Heat and oxidation can easily equal the damage of fats and proteins. There is no practical definitive way that we, as consumers, can tell how much damage was done in this process.
My suggestion has always been that if you aren’t going to make it yourself, look for the brand with the least amount of oily separation in the jar. This is not to say that all raw nut and seed butter are bad, just use caution and use whole hemp seed as more of a staple, saving the nut butters for more recreational use. They too can be used in smoothies or dressings/sauces and as a spread. Check ingredient labels; salt or other ingredients may be added.
 
Hemp Seed Oil
This is the oil which is obtained by pressing the hemp seed and it can be used in dressings / sauces, drizzled on your meal, in a smoothie, or ingested as a supplement. Again, the importance of cold-processing is extremely critical. This oil is should always be refrigerated. Like flax oil, it is highly perishable and should be purchased in small bottles so that it will not remain opened and unused in storage for a lengthy period of time. Never use hemp seed oil for cooking, as the healthy fats will be transformed into harmful fats. While this oil is certainly high quality, keep in mind that oils bring pure fat to the table and whether good or bad, too much causes distress in the body. Again, my first choice is always the whole hemp seed, because you get the whole balanced food and not just one aspect of it and in a less processed state. Use all oil sparingly and it can be a healthy addition to your daily intake.
 
Hemp Protein Powder
In a purely hemp form, this powder can be useful for boosting a blended mixture. Look for cold-milled brands, such as that from Hemptons, to ensure that processing has had minimal detrimental effect on the nutritional quality of the powder. My opinion is that the shelled hemp seed nuts blend in to a shake just as easily and are tastier, so unless you are looking for other ingredients that might be contained along with the hemp protein powder, it is better to just use the nuts.
 
Hemp Flour
Most of these products do not have a place in a raw food diet. Hemp flour is usually incorporated into baked goods using flour and other processed ingredients. While it is healthier than wheat flour, as it does not contain gluten, cannot be used as a substitute – as the baked goods won’t rise. It is good if you want to increase the protein percentage.

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Hemp Foods

Hemp SeedHemp foods are made from hemp seeds and are incredibly nutritious.
They offer a wide variety of important health attributes. They boosts the immune system, provides fiber to care for the digestive tract, are a great source of protein, and contain healthy omega-3 fats. Regular intake of hemp foods can help to improve overall health and may even stave off some diseases.
The majority of all hemp foods are made from Canadian grown and processed hemp seeds.
Many people think of Hemp is Marijuana – not realising that – as Broccoli and Cauliflower are from the same family, but not the same plant – so Hemp and Marijuana are from the same family, but is not the same plant.
Hemp does not have the same chemical make-up as Marijuana (it does contains some of the same cannabinoids – but, it’s THC content is normally lower than 0.03% as opposed to Marijuana that can be as high as 29%).

Types of Hemp Foods

Hemp products are available in different forms and can be easily added to everyone’s daily diet. There are many forms of hemp foods that can be used alone or used in several recipes. There are different ways that hemp foods can be used alone or in recipes. Some of the most popular forms of hemp foods include:

  • Whole Hemp Seeds
  • Shelled Hemp Seed (hemp hearts / hulled hemp seeds)
  • Hemp Seed Oil
  • Hemp Protein
  • Hemp Milk
  • Hemp Butter

Whole hemp seeds are really versatile. They can be added to almost any recipe to increase fiber, protein and/or healthy oil intake. Shelled hemp seeds, also called hemp hearts or hulled hemp seeds have a taste similar to pine nuts and can be eaten in a similar way.
Hemp Seed Oil is best to use as a finishing oil such as salad dressing or drizzled over your veggies just before eating. Hemp protein is among the most nutritious and can help the body cleanse the intestinal tract. It can be used just like whey or soy protein without the nasty side effects (some people experience the side effects of lactose intolerance with Whey proteins – and soy contains chemicals that actually inhibit the human body from absorbing the protein it contains – so it has to be processed before the proteins are available – this is not the case with Hemp). Hemp Milk is similar to almond or soy milk and can be substituted for dairy milk in recipes. Hemp Butter is similar to Almond and/or Peanut butter – but as Hemp is not a nut, is safe (and a yummy alternative) for people who have nut allergies.

Hemp Foods

 HulledSeedShelled Hemp Seed can be used alone or in almost any recipe. In the form of shelled seeds (“hemp hearts”) it can be sprinkled onto cereal or added to a fruit smoothie to boost protein intake for breakfast. For lunch, hemp hearts are a tasty addition to a salad or can be tossed onto vegetables for added protein and healthy fats. For dinner place a handful of hemp seeds on top of pasta or stir fry. As a snack or dessert, mix in some hemp seeds with yogurt.
hemp-seed-oilGHemp Seed Oil can be used in baking and light cooking. However, hemp seed oil has a low flash point, which means it will start to smoke at fairly low temperatures. You should never cook with hemp seed oil as heat destroys the goodness in the oil. Therefore, it’s best to use hemp seed oil as a “finishing oil” which means that it should be consumed raw. Use as a salad dressing, either as vinegar and oil, or as a prepared dressing such as ranch. You can use hemp seed oil as a substitute for other fats, such as butter on a baked potato or rice. Some prefer to simply use hemp seed oil as a supplement – consume 1-2 Tablespoons per day as needed.
Hemp Seed Oil is high in Essential Fatty Acids – and the Omega 6 and Omega 3 is in the optimal balanced ratio of 3:1 – making it the best vegetable based Omega supplement for long term use.
hemp-protein-powderHemp Protein is generally available in four different varieties with varying levels of protein: 34%, 50%, 60% and 70%. Hemp protein is made from milling the seed cake into flour that is left over from pressing whole hemp seed into oil. Further processing of sifting out the fiber is performed to increase protein and decrease fiber content.
Hemp Protein contains all 20 Amino Acids. Including the 9 Essential Amino Acids.
The 70% hemp protein is a concentrate which is water soluble. This means it will dissolve into water or other liquids. No matter which variety you choose, hemp protein is usually used as a source of protein in fruit smoothies.
There are hundreds of ways to use hemp in almost all of your recipes — you can be creative and find new and innovative ways to include them in your diet. Add them to your family’s diet every day to enjoy the many health benefits of hemp.

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Hemp Seed’ s Protein 65% Globulin Edestin… Your Building Block of Life and Immunity!!

The hemp seed protein is 65% Globulin Edestin. Globulin is the third most abundant protein in the human body. Globulins perform many enzymatic (causing reactions to take place) functions within the plasma itself. More importantly, they are responsible for both the natural and acquired immunity a person has against invading organisms. The body uses globulin proteins to make antibodies which attack infecting agents (antigens) that invade the body. Globulins like gamma globulin are absolutely essential to maintain a healthy immune system. They neutralize alien microorganisms and toxins.
globulin_antibodyGlobulins are divided into three classes: alpha, beta and gamma globulins. Alpha and beta globulins operate as transport vehicles by combining with other substances and carry protein from one part of the body to another. They haul the materials needed to build new and replace worn or damaged bodily structures. Gamma globulins are divided into five classes of antibodies called immune-globulins. All are formed to combat specific cell invading antigens. They comprise the body’s first line of defense against disease and infection. Immuno-globulins are produced by B lymphocyte (white blood cells) plasma cell clones located in lymph system nodes. Infecting antigens normally must pass through the lymph system before entering the blood stream.
Globulins are one of seven classes of simple proteins. Simple proteins are constructed from amino acids and contain no non-protein substances. Globulins are in seeds and animal blood. Edestins are found in seeds; serum globulin is in blood. Edestins are plant globulins. Globulins, along with albumins are classified as globular proteins. All enzymes, antibodies, many hormones, hemoglobin and fibrogin (the body converts fibrogin into non-soluble, fibrin, a blood clotting agent) are globular proteins. They carry out the main work of living.
Albumin, Globulin and Fibrogin are the three major types of plasma proteins. Plasma is the fluid portion of blood that supplies nutrients to tissues.  The three protein types: serum albumin, serum globulin and fibrogin, compose about 80% of plasma solids. These plasma proteins serve as a reservoir of rapidly available Amino Acids should any body tissues be in need. Plant seeds contain albumin and globulin but no fibrogin. Albumin is the nutritive material that fills the space in the seed between the embryo and the seed coat. The embryo needs albumin to fuel its initial growth until photosynthesis begins. Globulin edistins within the embryo guarantee this new life has the enzymes necessary for metabolic activity.
Since hemp seed protein is 65% Globulin Edestin and also includes  Albumin, its protein is readily available in a form quite similar to that found in blood plasma. Eating hemp seeds gives the body all the essential amino acids required to maintain health and provides the necessary kinds and amounts of amino acids the body needs to make human serum albumin and serum globulins like the immune enhancing gamma globulins. Eating hemp seeds could aid, if not heal, people suffering from immune deficiency diseases.
So based on this scientific reasoning it is true that Hemp seed is the premier plant-seed provider of globulin starting material — the highest in the plant kingdom.
Eating hemp seeds will insure the immune system has the reservoir of immuno-globulin resources needed to make disease destroying antibodies!
 Reference: Hemp Line Journal, July-August 1992, pp. 14-15, Vol. I No. 1

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Edestin, a globulin protein found only in Hemp Seeds…increases DNA repair!

hemp-protein-2Almost two-thirds of hemp protein is made up of Edestin, a globulin protein found only in hemp seeds. This makes hemp the superior source for this protein in the plant kingdom. Edestin is a type of plant protein that is similar to protein found in the human body and thus is perfectly suited to aid in meeting the body’s cellular needs such as DNA repair. Since much of hemp’s protein resembles that found in human blood, hemp protein is very easily digested and assimilated. In addition, another one-third of hemp’s protein is albumin, another high quality globulin protein also found in egg whites.
With a protein structure of 66% Edestin and 33% Albumin, hemp seeds contain all 8 Essential Amino Acids plus 2 conditionally Essential Amino Acids. In addition to its surprising protein profile, it also contains the perfect ratio of Omega Fatty Acids researchers recommend for good health
Why Are Amino Acids Important?hempseeds
A human being needs 21 Amino Acids to survive:  Eight are essential and must be obtained from food; two are conditionally essential and can be synthesized if all the eight essential amino acids are consumed. No other plant or animal source, aside from Hemp, contains the first ten amino acids necessary for health. Nor do any of them contain the balanced fatty acid ratio essential for life.
Hemp seeds are not unique among plant seeds in having all the essential Amino Acids. However, they are unique in that they have them in the correct ratio and they are in the form of Globulin Edestin at 65% of the protein content. The other 35% of the protein content is Albumin.
The globulins contained in hemp seeds are one of the seven classes of 100% pure Amino Acids. Globulins make up the portion of seed between the embryo and the seed coat and they are a fraction of all animal and human blood. Edestin globulin comes from seed;  globulin is in blood plasma. Globulin and Albumin are classified as globular proteins. All the enzymes, antibodies, many hormones, hemoglobin and fibrogin are made from globular proteins.
Albumin, Globulin and Fibrogin make up the fluid part of blood plasma. The protein portion of the blood answers the call of tissues in need by providing nutrients, vitamins and minerals.
When purchasing a hemp protein powder you should be looking for a brand that supplies at least 50% protein by weight, supplying 15 grams of protein per 30 gram serving.

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Hulled Hemp Seed .. little known facts

hempnut_thRaw hemp seeds provides great energy, permits weight control without hunger, reduces cravings for inappropriate foods and promotes extensive health benefits, Realize that it’s just that easy to BECOME your own health authority, the benefits instantly eliminates any need to be a “food fanatic”, it’s a no brainer for what’s in store for you by simply adding these powerful little seeds to your daily regime. Consume the essential nutrients each morning when your body needs “fuel”; Reduce your daily consumption of non-essential sugars, saturated fats and carbohydrates.
Blend Hemp Seeds into your morning protein shakes for an extra boost of energy, protein, essential fats and antioxidants!
A must have in any gym bag!
Add it to your favorite yogurt, or soups to give your meal a boost of Omega & Aminos!
Take your hemp seeds with you when you eat out in restaurants. Simply sprinkle generous amounts of hemp seeds over your meal to quickly enhance the nutritional value of the meal … even in the restaurant.
Take a small zip lock or spice jar filled with hemp seeds, next time you have a craving or hunger pang at your desk… grab it kinda of snack, really good for brain function, stabilizing blood sugar, and energy.
If you are making yourself a wrap or pita, lettuce wrap… don’t forget to add your hemp seeds before you close it up.
Make Hemp milk, super easy check out our recipe section… then make your favorite milkshake using your hemp milk, ice cream or yogurt, a cup of your favorite fresh (or frozen berries) 2 oz. of hemp seeds and blend. Add ice if desired before blending.
Mix it in with your vegan patties for extra protein & fats to make it more complete as a non-meat delicious hemp burger patties.
Add the hemp seeds to your favorite soups, chilli or stir fry!
No matter how you use them, hemp seeds are a quick and convenient way to add flavor and instant nutritional value to most anything ..  so go ahead… time to make Hulled Hemp Seeds part of your daily regime!!

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Hemp Protein for Healthy Muscle Growth

Hemp protein contains all 20 known Amino Acids including the 9 essential Amino Acids (EAAs) our bodies cannot produce.  Proteins are considered complete when they contain all 9 essential Amino Acids in a sufficient quantity and ratio to meet the body’s needs.  Hemp seeds contain an adequate supply of these high quality proteins (EAAs) for a well balanced diet.
Hemp protein is free of the tryspin inhibitors which block protein absorption and free of oligosaccharides found in soy, which cause stomach upset and gas.
Not as easy to get lean now that you are no longer in your twenties, right? Or maybe you’ve never been very fit, but are trying to lose fat for the first time and don’t have the benefits of that youthful high metabolism.
No bizarre fad diets are needed, just the standard high protein/low fat plan.  Each daily meal should feature a good source of lean protein but very little animal fat or sugar.  An increasingly educated and health-conscious public is learning about the health benefits of supplemental protein powders, recognizing that they can be part of a healthy lifestyle for just about anyone, not just bodybuilders.
In health fitness, muscle growth is perhaps the most important thing that you can do.  In fact, it may be the most important thing you can do for your body and mind.
The reason growing lean muscle is so important is because it will help with controlling your weight by helping you burn more calories.  It helps the mind by increasing confidence and self worth.  It is of utmost importance in the elderly population, because it will help with osteoporosis, by building stronger, bigger bones and also allows one to be physically stronger and fatigue less easily.
So by growing more muscle daily tasks are much easier, not to mention much safer, helping prevent falls and injuries.  Protein is an essential part of our (living) body and there is a difference between protein that has been cooked and protein in its raw (living) form.  We should realize that our body (which is made of some 100 trillion living cells) is composed of 15 percent protein, making protein the primary solid element in our body and second only to water, which composes 70 % of our body.  Protein is composed of Amino Acids and Amino Acids are made up of chains of atoms.
These atoms that make up Amino Acids that make up protein literally become the building blocks for our body. The problem is that cooking kills food and de-natures or re-arranges the molecular structure of the protein, causing Amino Acids to become coagulated, or fused together.
In his 1980 book, The Health Revolution, Horne writes, “Cooked protein is difficult to digest and when incompletely digested protein enters the colon it putrefies and ammonia is formed. ” Horne quotes Dr.  Willard Visek, Professor of Clinical Sciences at the University of Illinois Medical School as saying, “In the digestion of proteins, we are constantly exposed to large amounts of ammonia in our intestinal tract.  Ammonia behaves like chemicals that cause cancer or promote its growth.  It kills cells, it increases virus infection, it affects the rate at which cells divide and it increases the mass of the lining of the intestines.  What is intriguing is that within the colon, the incidence of cancer parallels the concentration of ammonia. ” Dr. Visek is quoted in The Golden Seven Plus One, by Dr. C. Samuel West, as saying, “Ammonia, which is produced in great amounts as a by-product of meat metabolism, is highly carcinogenic and can cause cancer development. ”And meat in any form is not good for humans.  We do not have a digestive system designed to assimilate protein from flesh: We do not have the teeth of a carnivore nor the saliva.  Our alkaline saliva is designed to digest complex carbohydrates from plant food, whereas saliva of a carnivore is so acidic that it can actually dissolve bones.  The digestive tracts of carnivores are short, about three times the length of their torso, allowing quick elimination of decomposing and putrefying flesh.
All herbivores have long intestines, 8 to 12 times the length of their torso, to provide a long transit time to digest and extract the nutrients from plant foods.  When you consider the health problems caused by consuming too much indigestible (cooked) protein, it should drive home the point that our body is a living organism made up of living cells and protein composes 15 percent of our body, therefore the protein we take in should be living rather than dead.  Hemp protein is a living plant protein which contains all 20 known Amino Acids including the 9 essential Amino Acids (EAAs) our bodies cannot produce.
When pressed and milled, the result is the perfect high performance vegetarian whole food which may be used in place of all protein sources or supplements.  Proteins are considered complete when they contain all 9 essential Amino Acids in a sufficient quantity and ratio to meet the body’s needs.  Hemp seeds contain an adequate supply of these high quality proteins (EAAs) for a well balanced diet.  In fact, hemp Protein is not only very high in fiber, but is unique in the plant kingdom for its perfect balance of protein, fiber and carbohydrates, making it easy to substitute into any type of diet.
A live protein concentrate, hemp protein is loaded with what your body needs, including all 9-10 essential Amino Acids, Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, enzymes, natural anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals and fibre.
Hemp protein is free of the tryspin inhibitors which block protein absorption and free of oligosaccharides found in soy, which cause stomach upset and gas.  Soybeans contain a higher total percentage of protein, but these are complex proteins that many people find difficult to digest.  An important aspect of hemp seed protein is a high content of arginine (123 mg/g protein) and histidine (27 mg/g protein), both of which are important for growth during childhood and of the sulfur-containing Amino Acids methionine (23 mg/g protein) and cysteine (16 mg/g protein), which are needed for proper enzyme formation.
Cysteine’s importance is related to the presence of a sulfur-containing thiol group in its side chain.  This group participates in the catalytic reactions of certain enzymes, such as that of papain.  Methionine is required because it assists in the breakdown of fats and thereby prevents the build-up of fat in the arteries, as well as assisting with the digestive system and removing heavy metals from the body since it can be converted to cysteine, which is a precursor to gluthione, which is of prime importance in detoxifying the liver.  The Amino Acid methionine is also a great antioxidant as the sulfur it supplies inactivates free radicals.
It may also be used to treat depression, arthritis pain as well as chronic liver disease – although these claims are still under investigation.  Some studies have also indicated that methionine mightalso improve memory recall.  Approximately 65% of the protein in hemp seeds is made up Edestin and is found only in hemp seed.
“Edistins (also spelled edestine) are plant globulins and are classified as globular proteins.  Globulins perform many enzymatic functions within the plasma itself.  The human body uses globulin proteins to make antibodies that attack infecting agents that invade the body. ”Edestin aids digestion, is relatively phosphorus-free and considered the backbone of the cell’s DNA.
The other one third of hemp seed protein is Albumin, another high quality globulin protein similar to that found in egg whites.  In addition to being an excellent protein source, hemp powder can also be used as a quick and convenient blood sugar stabilizer because of the high fiber content which will again help in weight loss.