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5 Worst Post-workout nutrition mistakes

5-Worse-Post-Workout-Nutrition-Mistakes
Take your post-workout gains way up by avoiding these post-workout nutrition mistakes:

  1. Water Sippin’

Own It: You’re not drinking enough
You went hard in your workout. Your dripping wet with sweat. You look like a shaggy dog that’s run through a sprinkler. In that sweat you lose more than water. Sweat is made up of water and electrolytes like sodium, potassium, chloride and magnesium.
Elevate It: Get hydrated
Re-hydrating after your workout is crucial to recovery and sometimes water alone isn’t enough. You also need to replenish electrolytes, which play a role in everything from muscle function to heart efficiency. Let’s just say, if your skin is starting to look and feel like leather you may need to up your hydration game.
Take small sips of water all day long. Sip water throughout your workout and drink a rehydrating drink after. One that replaces the electrolytes sodium and potassium.
 

  1. Whey vs. Plant-Based; Protein Game Strong

Own It: You’ve been using the same protein powder for years.
Having whey as your only protein option is like on fleek being the only way to say you’re looking good. It gets tired, fast. You’re strong and working on those gains but save the curls for the gym and put down that massive tub of whey protein. Instead, consider your options.
Elevate It: Vary your protein
There’s a world of protein options out there. We love plant-based protein because it has what you’re looking for – the amino acids you need to help build and repair muscles. In addition, plant-based protein can be more sustainable from growth to production than animal protein.
Meet your new protein bullpen:
Pea protein: Lactose-free, pea protein has sodium, helping to replenish what you left on the floor.
Hemp protein: With its complete amino acid profile, hemp protein has all of the essential amino acids you need to get from your diet. This includes BCAAs (branched chain amino acids), which can help your body recover.
Get these proteins and in every scoop with Hemptons Pure Plant Protein and Pure Hemp Protein Powder.
 

  1. Started From the Bottom of the Fuel Tank

Own It: You’re not eating enough
You want to make strength gains, change your body composition or just be ready for whatever life throws at you. Whatever your goal, don’t starve your muscles and deplete your energy by not eating enough.
Elevate It: Fuel the right way
Your body needs fuel for energy, strength and repair during recovery. Keep it real, get your macros (protein, fat, carbohydrates) from real, whole foods and give your body the nourishment it needs. Honor your hunger and make sure you are consuming enough throughout the day. Not sure exactly what that looks like? Think organic veggies and fruits in all the rainbow colours. Free range meats and poultry. Real food. No over processed, sugar laden snacks and take-aways.
 

  1. Takeout Bling

Own It: You waited too long to eat
Now you’re calling up you know who, for you know what. Takeout, pizza, whatever your go-to choice is, if you wait too long to eat you’re more inclined to make poor decisions when you’re starving later.
Elevate It: Eat within 20 minutes
Ignoring your hunger post-workout is like ignoring the flat on your bike. Sure, you can ride (or go without eating) for a while but it’ll catch up with you. Just like you don’t want to walk your bike, you want to avoid dialling up that takeout hotline and eating something that’s doesn’t support your goals. Within 20 minutes post-workout, look for easy to digest carbs paired with protein (think fruit with a few nuts) to help replenish muscle glycogen faster than carbs alone.
 

  1. Overindulging

Own It: You use the gym as excuse to eat anything you want
Just because you hit the gym, hard, doesn’t mean you can eat and drink whatever, whenever, because the truth is you can’t out squat, lift or out run a poor diet.
Elevate It: Eat nutrient dense foods
Your diet plays a role in how quickly you’ll reach your workout goals. Focus your diet around nutrient dense foods (clean protein, fat, fibre, vitamins and minerals) for fewer calories. Eat a balance of clean protein (like lentils and beans), fats (see: olive oil and avocado), fibre (hello veggies, whole grains and fruit) to be ready for whatever life throws at you.
With your post-workout fuel on point, your future workouts will be the best you ever had.

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Harvest the Fruits of Your Labour – The right Nutrition during Recovery from Training plays a vital role in reaping the Rewards

FOLLOWING A TRAINING SESSION, RECOVERY IS THE MAIN PRIORITY FOR AN ATHLETE. CORRECTLY PLACED TRAINING STRESSES TRIGGER THE BODY TO REACT, ADAPT AND IMPROVE. CHOOSING THE CORRECT AND APPROPRIATE NUTRIENTS FOLLOWING A TRAINING LOAD IS VERY IMPORTANT, AS NUTRIENTS INFLUENCE AMONG OTHERS THE METABOLIC AND HORMONAL ENVIRONMENT, WHICH IN TURN INFLUENCES TRAINING ADAPTATIONS AND PERFORMANCE INCREASES. THE RIGHT SPORTS NUTRITION STRATEGY NOT ONLY IMPROVES TRAINING SPECIFIC ADAPTATIONS IN THE BODY, BUT ALSO SUPPORTS YOU, AND ALLOWS YOU TO BE READY TO PERFORM AT YOUR OPTIMAL LEVEL AGAIN SOONER – WHICH ULTIMATELY LEADS TO AN INCREASE IN EXERCISE PERFORMANCE.

Recovery phases should not be seen as a fixed ‘window of time’, which opens after training and then shuts precisely 29 min and 59 secs later, but should be viewed more as a continuum. However, immediately after training, i.e. in the early phase of recovery, several metabolic processes in the body, which enhance the storage of glycogen in the muscle and promote the building of new muscle protein, are maximally active. If the body is simultaneously provided with the right nutrients during this time, these recovery phases can be maximally utilized.

Carbohydrates
Carbohydrates are required to replenish depleted energy stores in the body, i.e. the glycogen stores in the liver and muscles. Directly following a training session the total amount of carbohydrate required depends on numerous factors, such as: the training plan, training stress, volume of work and exercise goal, as well as the timing of meals planned later that day. It is fact, that an enhanced storage of carbohydrates in the energy stores of the body can be achieved immediately after a training session. The immediate, maximal replenishment of depleted glycogen stores is especially important for athletes who want to be able to perform at maximal intensity again only a short while after the last hard training session has ended. In this case the ‘reloading’ of stores should begin immediately after the training session, with approx. 0.8-1.2 g of carbohydrates per kg bodyweight. An hour later further carbohydrate-rich snacks or meals should be incorporated.
Keep in mind that the most important factor in the rate of replenishment of the body’s own glycogen stores is the total amount of carbohydrates consumed. If the training session wasn’t overly hard and of short duration, a fast supply of carbohydrates is generally not necessary. In situations like these it is certainly possible to wait until the next full meal to replenish the glycogen stores.

Protein
During exercise the body shifts from a well-balanced protein metabolism to catabolism and muscle tissue structures get damaged. Following a training session our metabolism is working flat out, and the previous training load has stimulated the body to build new muscle protein. Especially after an intense endurance exercise or weight training session it makes sense to supply the body with the optimal amount of high-quality protein (approx. 20-25g dependant on several factors; for young adults 0.3g/kg bodyweight is recommended), such as hemp protein, to promote muscle repair and building processes. However, the body doesn’t only react more sensitively to protein directly after a session, but actually for up to approx. 24 hours following a workout. The current scientific recommendation is therefore to plan the right amount of protein immediately after intense/hard sessions (key training sessions), as well as in regular intervals spread across the day, and also shortly before going to bed if required.

Fluids and electrolytes
Sophisticated and well planned fluid and electrolyte strategies after exercise are only necessary if there are very short recovery periods between workouts, and there is an acute and large loss of fluids and salts (i.e. sodium). Otherwise it is possible to address the fluid and electrolyte loss through normal drinking and eating habits.

Suggestions for recovery meals (add fluids depending on requirements) :
Low carb option – including approx. 25g of protein (e.g. following a low-intensity or moderately hard training session)
1 Protein shake (25g Hemptons Pure Hemp Protein)
250ml Coconut Water
1 Teaspoon Honey
1 portion of low fat, plain Greek yoghurt (200g) with low-sugar fruits (e.g. raspberries)

Carbohydrate-rich option – including approx. 50-60g carbohydrates and approx. 20-25g protein (e.g. following an intense and prolonged training session)
1 Protein shake (50g Hemptons Pure Hemp Protein)
2 Handfuls (approx. 70g) raisins
1 tub cottage cheese (200g)
2 tablespoons honey
1 sliced banana
With over 25 years experience in professional sports, the Sports Scientist and expert book author on Swimming Holger Lüning is aware that the correct nutritional measures in the early phases of recovery are all too often neglected. “Especially for athletes that do not have an appetite immediately after hard training sessions I recommend liquid nutrition, such as recovery shakes. As a result, the first intake of nutrients even immediately after hard sessions is ensured, as many find it easier to drink something rather than eat in such situations”.

Conclusion
Immediately after an intense training session the correct choice of nutrients influences recovery – an important part for training success. But also later meals and snacks should be carefully planned and selected. It’s important not to forget that sleep plays a major role during recovery and that nutrition also influences this period. A sub-optimally created evening meal can influence sleep quality and reduce night-time recovery. It’s essential to always remember: every athlete is an individual. A one-size-fits-all recovery nutrition strategy does not exist!

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Nature's Forgotten Nutraceutical

by Darrell L. Tanelian, M.D., Ph.D. – www.hemptons.co.za

That the Hemp plant (Cannabis sativa) is used as a food source initially surprises and confuses most people. The public misinformation system has largely restricted knowledge of “Hemp” as it being Marijuana … which is actually derived from the Cannabis Indica plant (same family .. different plant – like broccoli and cauliflower, same family, different plant), with its leaf content of the psychoactive substance delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).
Oil, Shelled Seed, Flour, Hemp Cake, paint and more are made from the seed, while rope and cloth is made from the Fibre of the Cannabis Sativa plant and paper from the plant stalk.
Both the oldest Chinese agricultural treatise, the Xia Xiao Zheng, written in the 16th century BC and other Chinese records discuss Hemp as one of the major grain crops grown in ancient China.
Besides its propagation in China, the cultivation and use of Hemp has, since the beginnings of recorded history, also been documented by many other great civilizations, including: India, Sumeria, Babylonia, Persia, Egypt and other nations of the Near East and the Aztec and Mayan civilizations of South America; as well as by native cultures in North America and Europe. Indeed, it might be said that over these thousands of years, Hemp has always followed humankind throughout the world, or vice versa. Nutritionally, the key point about Hemp is that its edible portion – the meat of the shelled seed – resembles the seeds of other cultivated grains including wheat and rye and does not contain THC. Moreover, the strains of Hemp plant used for food have been naturally selected so as to produce little or no THC, generally. These nutritional varieties of Hemp plant grow in temperate climates to heights of 14 feet and as with many agricultural grains, their seeds can be harvested in a conventional manner with a combine. Since the most modern handling and shelling of the seed minimize its contact with leaf resins, the shelled seed itself and the oil, nut butter and other foods prepared from the seed have been made with THC concentrations as low as 1 ucg/g (ppm) to non-detectible. These modern Hemp products, when consumed in normally recommended amounts, should all but eliminate positive urine tests for THC.
Studies conducted on older versions of Hemp seed oil found some to contain THC concentrations that resulted in positive urine tests

Nutrients in Hemp Seed

The most basic Hemp seed product is the shelled seed, sometimes referred to as the “Hemp Nut.” The other major Hemp food products are Hemp seed nut butter – which resembles peanut- and other nut butters – cold-pressed Hemp seed oil and Hemp seed flour. These basic products can be consumed alone or used along with or instead of other grains, seeds, nuts and oils in any appropriate recipe. In terms of its nutrient content, shelled Hemp seed is 34.6% protein, 46.5% fat and 11.6% carbohydrate.
The most important feature of Hemp seed is that it provides both of the essential fatty acids (EFAs) needed in the human diet – GLA, Linoleic and Alpha-Linolenic acid -as well as a complete and balanced complement of all essential amino acids.

Fats in Hemp

As compared with most nuts and seeds, the 46.5% fat content of shelled Hemp seed is relatively low and Hemp food products have a low cholesterol content and high content of the natural phytosterols that reduce cholesterol levels. Hemp Seed Oil has on average the highest mono- and poly-unsaturated fat content of all oils, taken collectively, of between 80% and 89%.
The polyunsaturated Linoleic acid, an Omega-6 fatty acid, is present in Hemp seed oil in a content of 55.6g/100g and Alpha-Linolenic acid, a polyunsaturated Omega-3 fatty acid, is present at 17.2 g/100 g. The ratio of the two EFAs is 3.38, closely approximating the 4.0 average ratio recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), Sweden and Japan for the human diet.
Conveniently, Hemp Seed Oil is also one of the only food oils to contain the direct metabolites of Linoleic and Alpha-Linolenic acid – Gamma-Linolenic acid (GLA) and Stearidonic acid (SDA), respectively. Because of this, it can circumvent the impaired EFA metabolism and physical compromise that can result from genetic factors, intake of other fats, aging and lifestyle patterns.
By contrast with unsaturated fat, only 6.6% of the total calories in shelled Hemp seed come from saturated fat – a percentage that contrasts sharply with the 13 to 14% of saturated fat calories in the modern western diet.
This gives Hemp seed oil a polyunsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio of 9.7, in comparison to the current ratio of 0.44 in the western diet, 6 and indicates that consuming even a small portion of Hemp seed oil daily can contribute strongly to bringing this dietary imbalance back toward the World Heath Organisation recommended goal of 1.0.

Hemp Protein

Besides providing the human EFAs and having a favorable unsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio, Hemp seed is an excellent dietary source of easily digestible, gluten-free protein. Its overall protein content of 34.6 g/100 g is comparable to that of soy beans and better than that found in nuts, other seeds, dairy products, meat, fish, or poultry. Hemp protein provides a well-balanced array of the 10 essential amino acids for humans. An important aspect of Hemp seed protein is a high content of arginine (123 mg/g protein) and histidine (27 mg/g protein), both of which are important for growth during childhood and of the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine (23 mg/g protein) and cysteine (16 mg/g protein), which are needed for proper enzyme formation. Hemp protein also contains relatively high levels of the branched-chain amino acids that are important for the metabolism of exercising muscle.

Other Hemp Nutrients

The carbohydrate content of shelled Hemp seed is 11.5% and its sugar content is 2%. Of the shelled Hemp seed carbohydrate, 6% is in the form of fiber. The fiber content of Hemp seed flour is 40%, which is the highest of all commercial flour grains. In addition to containing the basic human nutrient groups, Hemp foods have a high content of antioxidants (92.1 mg/100g) in the form of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol. Additionally, Hemp seed contains a wide variety of other vitamins and minerals.

Hemp in Health and Disease Prevention

The high content of Omega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids and the relatively high phytosterol content of Hemp foods and oils, make them beneficial to cardiovascular health. Numerous human and animal studies have shown that substitution of polyunsaturated for saturated fats can reduce the risk of sudden cardiac arrest and fatal cardiac arrhythmia, as well as reducing blood cholesterol levels and decreasing the cellular proliferation associated with atherosclerosis.
A high polyunsaturated-to-saturated fat ratio, especially when it includes Linoleic acid, has also been positively associated with reduced arterial thrombosis.
Additionally, phytosterols, of which Hemp seed contains 438 mg/100g, have been shown to reduce total serum cholesterol by an average of 10% and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by an average of 13%.
Poly-unsaturated fatty acids and especially GLA, have also been found beneficial in treating various human cancers, 13-17 and studies have shown that phytosterols may offer protection against colon, breast and prostate cancers.
Besides the importance of a proper dietary ratio of Linoleic to Alpha-Linolenic acid in maintaining the polyunsaturated fatty acid composition of neuronal and glial membranes, membrane loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids has been found in such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and it has been suggested that a diet with a proper balance of Omega-6 to Omega-3 fatty acids may help delay or reduce the neurologic effects of these diseases. A fatty acid preparation with a ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 fatty acids of 4, which is practically identical to that in Hemp oil, has been shown to improve the quality of life of Alzheimer’s disease patients.
Additionally, GLA has been found effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis and active synovitis and the GLA and vitamin D content of Hemp foods may make them beneficial in preventing and treating osteoporosis.
Moreover, supplementation with products containing EFAs has been found capable of reversing scaly skin disorder, inflammation, excessive epidermal water loss, itch and poor wound healing caused by EFA deficiency and GLA has been shown to be beneficial for atopic eczema and psoriasis.

Hemp in Cosmetics and Processed Food Products

The critical importance of EFAs and especially GLA, for healthy skin makes Hemp seed oil a highly effective skin care and cosmetic product. Its lipid constituents allow it to permeate through intact skin and to thereby nourish skin cells directly while also carrying therapeutic substances with it into the skin. These properties have led to a multitude of soaps, shampoos, skin lotions, lip balms, conditioners and other skin-care products containing Hemp seed oil.
Among food products made from Hemp seed, oil and flour are beer, pasta, cheese, cookies, waffles, granola, candy, ice cream and others, with new products now being regularly developed.
In short, Hemp can constitute an important element in nutrition, health and cosmetics, with the prospect of playing a major role in preventing disease and reducing health care expenditures.
 

References

1.      Yu Y. Agricultural history over seven thousand years in China, In: Feeding a Billion: Frontiers of Chinese Agriculture, ed. S Witter, 1987.
2.      Li H. “The Origin and Use of Cannabis in Eastern Asia: Their Linguistic Cultural Implications,” in Cannabis and Culture, ed. V Rubin, The Hague: Mouton, 1975.
3.      Leson G, Pless P, Grotenherman F, Kalant H, ElSohly MA. Food products from Hemp seeds: Could their consumption interfere with workplace drug testing J Anal Toxicol, Accepted, 2000
4.      Bosy TZ, Cole KA. Consumption and quantitation of D9 tetrahydrocannabinol in commercially available Hemp seed oil products. Anal Toxicol, 7:562-6, 2000.
5.      Kris-Etherton PM, Taylor DS, Yu-Poth S et. al. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the food chain in the United States. Am J Clin Nutr, 71:179S-88S 2000.
6.      Eaton SB, Eaton III SB, Konner MJ. Paleolithic nutrition revisited: A twelve-year retrospective on its nature and implications. Eur J Clin Nutr 51:207-216, 1997.
7.      Brousseau ME, Schaefer EJ. Diet and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Trials. Curr Atheroscler Rep 2:487-493, 2000.
8.      Siscovic DS, Raghunathan TE, King I et. al. Dietary intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of primary cardiac arrest. Amer J Clin Nutr, 71:208S-212S, 2000.
9.      Kang JX, Leaf A. Prevention of fatal cardiac arrhymias by polyunsaturated fatty acids. Amer J Clin Nutr, 71:202S-207S, 2000
10.  Fan YY, Ramos KS, Chapkin RS. Modulation of atherosclerosis by dietary gamma-linolenic acid. Adv Exp Med Biol 469:485-91, 1999.
11.  Hornstra G, Kester AD. Effect of the dietary fat type on arterial thrombosis tendency: systemic studies with a rat model. Atherosclerosis 131:25-33, 1997
12.  Moghadasian MH, Frohlich JJ. Effects of dietary phytosterols on cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis: Clinical and experimental evidence. Amer J Med 107:588-94, 1999.
13.  Vartek S, Robbins ME, Spector AA. Polyunsaturated fatty acids increase the sensitivity of 36B10 rat astrocytoma cells to radiation-induced cell kill. Br J Cancer 77:1612-20, 1998.
14.  Kenny FS, Pinder SE, Ellis IO, et. al. Gamma-linolenic acid with tamoxifen as primary therapy in breast cancer. Int J Cancer 85:643-8, 2000
15.  Robbins M, Ali K, McCaw R, et. al. Gamma-linolenic acid-mediated cytotoxicity in human prostate cancer cells. Adv Exp Med Biol 469:499-504, 1999.
16.  Rizzo MT, Regazzi E, Garau D, et. al. Induction of apoptosis by arachodonic acid in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Cancer Res 59:5047-53, 1999.
17.  Southgate J, Pitt E, Trejdosiewicz LK. The effects of dietary fatty acids on the proliferation of normal human urothelial cells in vitro. Br J Cancer 74:728- 34, 1996.
18.  Awad AB, Fink CS. Phytosterols as anticancer dietary components: Evidence and mechanism of action. J Nutr 130:2127-30, 2000.
19.  Fenstrom JD. Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on neuronal function. Lipids 34:161-9, 1999.
20.  20.Youdim KA, Martin A, Joseph JA. Essential fatty acids and the brain: possible health implications. Int J Dev Neurosci 18:383-99, 2000.
21.  Yehuda S, Rabinovitz S, Carrasso RL, Mostofsky DI. Essential fatty acids preparation (SR-3) improves Alzheimer’s patients quality of life. Int J Neurosci 87:141-9, 1996.
22.  Leventhal LJ, Boyce EG, Zurier, RB. Treatment of arthritis with gamma-linolenic acid. Ann Intern Med 119:876-873, 1993.
23.  DeLuca P, Rothman D, Zurier RB. Marine and botanical lipids as immunomodulatory and therapeutic agtents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheum Dis Clin N Am 21:759-77
24.  Zurier RB, Rossetti RG, Jacobson EW, et. al. Gamma- linolenic acid treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum 39:1808-17, 1996.
25.  Kruger MC, Coetzer H, Winter R, et. al. Calcium, gamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaneoic acid supplementation in senile osteoporosis. Aging 10:385-94, 1998.
26.  Wright S. Essential fatty acids and the skin. Br J Derm 125:503-515, 1991.
27.  Horrobin DF. Essential fatty acid metabolism and its modification in atopic eczema. J Am Clin Nutr 71:367S-72S, 2000.

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Hemp Protein & Oatmeal

hemp-protein-powderIf you’re looking for a high-quality protein that’s not derived from animal sources, hemp protein powder might be for you. Mix the powder into smoothies or yogurt, but don’t stop there. Hemp protein powder may also boost the protein content of oatmeal, whether you cook it in the morning or make an overnight, soaked version. The powder contains multiple other nutrients to help you start your day right.

Not Complete

Some claim that hemp has all the essential amino acids, making it a complete protein on par with whey or soy. This is not the case, as a study in the “Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry” reported in 2010. Hemp protein lacks an adequate, digestible amount of the amino acid lysine. To ensure you get enough lysine, augment your meal of hemp protein and oats in the morning with a lunch that includes beans or lentils.

Adding Hemp to Breakfast

Hemp boosts your overall morning nutrition by providing you with essential fatty acids, iron, fiber, magnesium, potassium and calcium. Hemp-laced oatmeal also makes a quality post-workout meal to provide a combination of protein for muscle repair and carbohydrates for glycogen, or energy, restoration. One scoop of hemp protein adds about 10 grams of protein to the oats.

Mixing It In

Stir the protein powder in after you’ve cooked the oats. A tablespoon or two adds a nutty flavour and a greenish hue. Finish the oats with berries, milk and walnuts, or whatever other toppings you like. Alternatively, try the option of no-cook oatmeal by combining oats, almond milk, chia seeds, hemp protein, a little mashed banana and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Refrigerate overnight and enjoy the soft, puddinglike oats the next morning.

Quality Hemp

When shopping for hemp protein to add to your oats, go for organic varieties. Hemp readily absorbs pesticides, which may contaminate non-organic varieties. Freshness is also essential when purchasing hemp protein. If you don’t have ready access to hemp protein powder, you could add shelled hemp seeds to your oatmeal to gain the nutritional benefits of this seed.
Although hemp is related to marijuana botanically – just like broccoli and cauliflower are related, but not the same plant – hemp lacks the THC content that makes marijuana a psychoactive drug. You can’t get high from adding hemp protein to your oatmeal.

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Hemp Protein in Sport Nutrition

Today will be a very short post. Just ran across an older article I found really inspiring so felt I had to add two cents.
Hemp as a good protein source is starting to become an accepted option with the sporting fraternity.
For a very long time, many guys poo poo it, saying it didn’t stack up to their favourite goop of choice – whey.
BrendanBrazierWith guys like Brendan Brazier using and endorsing it however, there is a turn-around on this.
“Once I began eating more raw, natural, alkalizing, foods, my recovery time dramatically improved, as did the muscle and joint concerns. Raw, natural hemp protein is now my number one choice”. Brendan Brazier, Thrive
Read the full article on :
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/kristi17.htm

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Orange and Vanilla Hemp Shake

OrangeVanillaHempShakeServes 1
1 Large Navel Orange, Skin Cut Off And White Rind Removed
1 Large Banana
2 Cups Hemp Milk
Seeds From 1/2 Vanilla Bean, Scraped Out, Or 1 Tsp Vanilla Extract
2 Tbsp Hemp Protein Powder
4 Large Kale Leaves, Tough Stems Removed
 
Blend all ingredients in a high speed blender till smooth. Can serve one or two, depending on appetite!
Some notable health benefits of this smoothie/shake include Vitamin C from the orange, Omega-3 fatty acids and protein from the hemp milk and hemp protein, natural energy from the sweetness of banana and orange, Vitamin A, iron, and calcium from the kale, and a bundle of phytonutrients. Plus the deliciousness that is fresh vanilla!

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Blueberry Hemp Shake

 BlueberrySmoothieServes 1
1 Cup Frozen Blueberries
3 Heaped Tbsp Hemp Seeds
2 Tbsp Hemp Protein Powder
1 Cup Hemp Milk
2 Pitted Dates
1 Cup Spinach
1 Tsp Cinnamon
1 Tsp Maca*
Blend all ingredients in a high speed blender. Add more almond milk if the texture is too thick. Enjoy!
*Maca is an herbaceous plant native to the high Andean Mountains of Bolivia and Peru. It is one of the only food plants in the world able to thrive at such a high altitude. Maca, and more specifically the root of the plant, has a long history as a superfood. The maca root was prized throughout the Incan empire for its adaptogenic-like qualities that enable it to nourish and balance the body’s delicate endocrine system, and to help cope with stress. It also energizes naturally, without the jitters and crashes of caffeine, and it can aid in reproductive function, helping to balance hormones and increase fertility. 

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How to build muscle – the natural way

By: Wade McNutt
wade-pose“Last night a couple of good friends came over to the house. It was great to catch up with good friends and have a few laughs. Now Dale and Howard are in the early 50’s and they both look amazing. They’ve followed my training and diet strategies for several years and look and at least 20 years younger than their chronological age. In fact they run circles around their friends who are half their age.
After we caught up on all the developments in our personal lives the topic quickly changed to “yep, you guessed it” diet and exercise. Both of the guys commented on how much bigger I am since we last spent time together a little over 6 months ago. In fact they said “okay Wade, what’s are you doing to pack on so much muscle?” “Are you eating a ton of protein, come up some wild supplement, or invented some new training strategy? Tell us what your doing!”
I had to laugh. “Well, you’re never going to believe it but I am lucky if I take in 50 grams of protein a day. I wish you could have seen the look of shock on their faces. Of course I was quick to follow up with the science behind the way I eat.
First off, I only consume protein that is live. In other words, protein that has not been denatured by heat, cooked, irradiated, or processed at high temperatures. My only sources of protein are plant proteins. In fact my favorite super protein is called Hemp protein, which is probably one of the most anabolic proteins on the planet.
First off I am doing a high-bred FBN training program but that’s been standard training science for me for the last few years. While it’s definitely high-level training, it’s no secret. Everybody who is a Freaky Insider is on one of the variants of the program.
How did I get big on 50 grams of protein a day when everyone else is slamming down two, three, even four hundred grams of protein or more a day in a futile attempt to gain muscle?
First I would like to say I know what this is like to be frustrated on the Mega Protein ingestion program. I slammed shake after shake for years. I ate chicken and tuna until I couldn’t eat it no more. (I got so sick of meat that I became a vegetarian). I ate so many eggs, I could have fueled a small country from the methane gas I was producing daily.’
Guess what? With all that protein consumption I still never grew any more muscle. “If that sounds familiar?” read on.
A wise man once said, “The definition of insanity was doing the same thing and expecting a different result”. Well I did the same thing for about 14 years before I figured out. “Hey, this high protein diet being hyped in all the mags by supplement companies doesn’t work”.
I mean if was as simple as eating more protein, everybody would be 500 pounds ripped, wouldn’t they?
The problem is the bodybuilders have become terrified, to lower their protein intake because they feel like they are going to shrink up and lose there muscles. I know when I switched to a low protein diet, I checked my muscles daily, to see if I lost anything.
Guess what? I didn’t lose any muscle in fact I started getting bigger and bigger. This was in complete violation of almost every single bodybuilding expert recommendation I have ever read in the last 20 years.
Only recently did I finally discover why or how all these experts missed the boat?
Dale and Howard both pressed me further. “How could all these experts be wrong?”
I quickly explained that the experts are all looking for one thing to cause another. Like eating protein, or taking a supplement, a special exercise. While no ONE thing causes growth, a variety of conditions must exist and growth happens automatically. Can you see the difference to what I am saying?
The both paused to think about it for a moment. I could see the wheels turning but I hadn’t got the picture clear yet.
You see growth simply occurs when all the conditions are right. It’s not “Caused” by training, massive protein intake, or enzymes. It simply happens when all of these factors are working together.
If someone is not growing muscle daily, it’s simple the conditions are not present that allow for growth. The question now becomes what are the conditions.
I go into detail about this on my training program Freaky Big Naturally, but will sum it up as best I can.
Training – If you want bigger than normal muscles you must provide stimulus to them in the forum of regular workouts. This is best performed by a systematic scientific training regimen.
Diet – You must provide sufficient enzymes, protein, minerals, vitamins, water and air. This is far less complicated than most people make it. Consider you breath in about 80 pounds of oxygen a day, means it’s a far more important nutrient than chicken breast. Try living without air. But lots of people live without chicken.
Mental Attitude – Most people are sorely lacking in this area. Every body talks a good mental game but few people employ mental training as part of their program. They ascribe to the “I am small” mentality”, or limiting mental belief systems that prevent them from really excelling. One of the biggest things I teach is how to “Think Big”.
That’s basically it. While they are lots of details within those 3 core components of getting big I can say with absolute certainty that eating mega high dosages of protein is not one of them. You’re far better off investing in a high quality coach to train your body than wasting thousands of dollars on buckets of protein goop that will never build any muscle.
Dale and Howard both echoed. “It’s really simple isn’t it?”
“You bet it is,” I echoed. Unfortunately most people just get in the way of themselves and listen too to many people.
Getting big is simple. Train properly, eat the right food and adopt a winning attitude and you can get as big as you want. Most people have a hard time believing it but after all my years in the game, I have learned how to create those conditions and it works every time. It’s not rocket science once you understand and apply the basic principles.
The bottom line is, if you’re not getting as big as you want, it’s because you’re not creating the conditions that create growth in your muscles and you need to alter one or all three of the components I listed.
Knowing when and how to do that takes expertise and the best way to eliminate the guesswork is to hire a professional coach to examine where you’re going wrong.”

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Hemp Seed’ s Protein 65% Globulin Edestin… Your Building Block of Life and Immunity!!

The hemp seed protein is 65% Globulin Edestin. Globulin is the third most abundant protein in the human body. Globulins perform many enzymatic (causing reactions to take place) functions within the plasma itself. More importantly, they are responsible for both the natural and acquired immunity a person has against invading organisms. The body uses globulin proteins to make antibodies which attack infecting agents (antigens) that invade the body. Globulins like gamma globulin are absolutely essential to maintain a healthy immune system. They neutralize alien microorganisms and toxins.
globulin_antibodyGlobulins are divided into three classes: alpha, beta and gamma globulins. Alpha and beta globulins operate as transport vehicles by combining with other substances and carry protein from one part of the body to another. They haul the materials needed to build new and replace worn or damaged bodily structures. Gamma globulins are divided into five classes of antibodies called immune-globulins. All are formed to combat specific cell invading antigens. They comprise the body’s first line of defense against disease and infection. Immuno-globulins are produced by B lymphocyte (white blood cells) plasma cell clones located in lymph system nodes. Infecting antigens normally must pass through the lymph system before entering the blood stream.
Globulins are one of seven classes of simple proteins. Simple proteins are constructed from amino acids and contain no non-protein substances. Globulins are in seeds and animal blood. Edestins are found in seeds; serum globulin is in blood. Edestins are plant globulins. Globulins, along with albumins are classified as globular proteins. All enzymes, antibodies, many hormones, hemoglobin and fibrogin (the body converts fibrogin into non-soluble, fibrin, a blood clotting agent) are globular proteins. They carry out the main work of living.
Albumin, Globulin and Fibrogin are the three major types of plasma proteins. Plasma is the fluid portion of blood that supplies nutrients to tissues.  The three protein types: serum albumin, serum globulin and fibrogin, compose about 80% of plasma solids. These plasma proteins serve as a reservoir of rapidly available Amino Acids should any body tissues be in need. Plant seeds contain albumin and globulin but no fibrogin. Albumin is the nutritive material that fills the space in the seed between the embryo and the seed coat. The embryo needs albumin to fuel its initial growth until photosynthesis begins. Globulin edistins within the embryo guarantee this new life has the enzymes necessary for metabolic activity.
Since hemp seed protein is 65% Globulin Edestin and also includes  Albumin, its protein is readily available in a form quite similar to that found in blood plasma. Eating hemp seeds gives the body all the essential amino acids required to maintain health and provides the necessary kinds and amounts of amino acids the body needs to make human serum albumin and serum globulins like the immune enhancing gamma globulins. Eating hemp seeds could aid, if not heal, people suffering from immune deficiency diseases.
So based on this scientific reasoning it is true that Hemp seed is the premier plant-seed provider of globulin starting material — the highest in the plant kingdom.
Eating hemp seeds will insure the immune system has the reservoir of immuno-globulin resources needed to make disease destroying antibodies!
 Reference: Hemp Line Journal, July-August 1992, pp. 14-15, Vol. I No. 1